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LakeWinnipeg/Manitoba
Lake Winnipeg

Lake Winnipeg Video Index
York Boats
Icefishing
Fishing Industry
Icelandic Settlers
Kathy's Marathon
Shipwrecks
Manitoba


The image of Lake Winnipeg dominates Manitoba's map - in the top twenty of the world's lakes by size, with an area of 24,500 sq. kilometres and 425 kilometres long, it is relatively shallow with an average depth of 62 metres.

The Lake Winnipeg area is home to the Cree and Ojibway native Canadians. Hudson's Bay Company explorer Henry Kelsey worked with them to develop the fur trade in the late 1600's. By the early 1700's, Pierre Gaultier de Varennes came on the scene, providing unexpected competition for that trade. By the late 1800's, European immigrants arrived on Lake Winnipeg's shores, including a large settlement from Iceland.


As a major attraction for relaxed vacationers and adventure eco-tourists both, the lake and its shores offers boating, hiking, cycling, camping and heritage activities. Wildlife viewing is popular - Lake Winnipeg provides a protected area for Piping Plovers, and it is a destination for migratory birds, including the American White Pelican.

Henry Kelsey Heads West
Overworked and unappreciated - today's beleaguered employees may have something in common with Henry Kelsey, the first white man to see the Canadian prairies.Learn more here.
Protecting the Piping Plover
Pity the Piping Plover: in May or June, just as the stocky little shorebird scrapes a shallow whisper of a nest on the shoreline of southern Lake Winnipeg, the beach is overrun by human holidayers. Learn more here.
The Cree: Provisioners of Trade
Known originally to the French as the "Kristinaux," the Algonkian-speaking Cree made their traditional home in the lands surrounding James Bay and the western shores of Hudson Bay.Learn more here.
Fishing Flexibility: The Key to Winnipeg Walleye
With its shallow waters and rapid replenishment rate, Lake Winnipeg is one of the most fertile fishing lakes in the world - and to the delight of anglers, it's chock full of walleye, North America's most sought-after sport fish. Learn more here.